The Moderating Impact of Types of Caregiving on Job Demands, Resources, and Their Relation to Work-to-Family Conflict and Enrichment

Abstract

This research aims to examine for whom combining work and family/caregiving may be most harmful. Employed parents, elder caregivers,
and the sandwiched generation were compared with their coworkers without such responsibilities. Based on the job demands–resources
model, we assumed that high job demands/low job resources would relate to work-to-family conflict (WFC) and low job demands/high
job resources to work-to-family enrichment. However, this effect would depend on employees’ family/caregiving responsibilities.
Using a large sample of Slovenian employees (N = 1,285), we found support for the moderating role of the type of caregiving responsibility between workload and WFC. In
addition, the type of caregiving had a moderating effect on the relationship between coworker support and WFC. Support was
also found for the differential impact of job resources on work-to-family enrichment. The results therefore indicate the relevance
of types of caregiving responsibility in work–family research and practice.

Comments Off on The Moderating Impact of Types of Caregiving on Job Demands, Resources, and Their Relation to Work-to-Family Conflict and Enrichment

Tags: ,

UA-25380860-1